Using the Science of Persuasion in Your End of Year Giving Campaigns

Kenny Jahng —  2012/11/28 — 3 Comments

So Want to improve your communications for end of year donor development or other community building campaign?

Take just one of the 6 core principles shared in this great video overview piece on the Science of Persuasion and you’ll be sure to see some improvements in responsiveness and engagement.

First, take a look at this fun video:

 

I’ve previously shared about the book, The Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity — edited by Daniel Oppenheimer and Christopher Olivola. If you want to learn more about the 6 principles shared in the video, that you’ll love this book — because it talks about the value, social factors, role of emotions and other important influences in charitable giving.

But again, even before diving into the Science of Giving book, I’d challenge you to take just one of the principles of persuasion presented here, and figure out a way to incorporate some of it into something you’re doing right now.  How can go back and revise language or positioning, or the sequence of messaging to leverage this learning?  Here’s a quick review again of the principles. . .

6-principles-of-persuasion

6 Principles of Persuasion

  1. Reciprocity – People tend to return a favor.  There is a perceived exchange that needs to take place when you trigger this principle
  2. Scarcity – We have all seen this in action: highlighting scarcity can lead to increased demand
  3. Authority – Presenting credentials to set-up authority can make a big impact on reception of messaging
  4. Consistency – It is amazing how compliance with smaller asks up front will allow people to follow-through with bigger asks later.
  5. Liking – The reason why Facebook ads feature people you know next to them that have already “liked” them first. It is why referral marketing is so important.
  6. Consensus – Social proof! This is one of the easiest things to integrate into your communication efforts right now.

So which one surprises you?  Which one are you already utilizing?  Which ones are you considering? Share below and commit to considering how to use it further in your communications work.

 

Related Posts with Thumbnails

3 responses to Using the Science of Persuasion in Your End of Year Giving Campaigns

  1. I think I am most surprised by #4- consistency. There is a part of me that thinks if you make too many asks, the one big ask will be perceived as annoying, or too much. It may be the straw that broke the camels back. You know? But, It makes sense. Interesting…

    • Great point Peter. If you read the research (or jump to the part in the that summarizes one example), the point is that people’s intentions/motivations are to stay consistent in their behavior. So if you are able to construct a smaller ask upfront, and then appropriately follow-up with a larger ask toward a consistent end-goal (like your cause), then people are more complaint in those cases. The smaller ask is sort of a stake in the ground for them. It is kind of a test for you. Does that make sense? Fascinating stuff.

Trackbacks and Pingbacks:

  1. Using the Science of Persuasion in Your End of Year Giving Campaigns | Church Web - 2012/11/28

    […] Church Web Design Source- godvertiser.com So Want to improve your communications for end of year donor development or other community building campaign? Take just one of the 6 core principles shared in this great video overview piece on the Science of Persuasion and you’ll be sure to see some improvements in responsiveness … […]

Leave a Reply

Text formatting is available via select HTML. <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*