Archives For Social Media

5 Ideas for Using Google Plus Hangouts for Church Communities

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Once in awhile you come upon communications execution that just hits the mark dead center.

Check out the fan celebration video published to this group’s YouTube channel:

So, who are these girls?

Sonia and Janice are Australian-born Korean twins who sing and post their cover performances on YouTube.   Their musical vids have gotten decent traction on YouTube.  Here’s an obligatory / I’m-lovin’-it example of their work:

And boy can they sing — over 1,000,000 people have subscribed to their channel that has only 38 videos so far.   Many of those videos have MILLIONS of views.  As much as over 20,000,000 views for a single video.

Wow.  So what’s the secret sauce to accruing so many subscribers?

See how the *directly* and *explicitly* engage with their fans on camera?  That’s a huge part of why they’ve gotten so much traction.

Take note: When they’re looking into the camera, they are talking to *you* — an individual — not the anonymous masses of fans that might be watching.  Even though this is a mass medium of communications, when you talk directly to the viewer (singular, not plural!), then you really have the chance to accomplish something — that’s make a connection.

Do you see the difference between broadcasting a generic message and delivering a personal message?  That’s how you do it.

Tell me what is keeping you from creating content like this where you are talking directly at the person watching?  I’d love to hear why your circumstances / brand / approach limits you from doing that.



It feels like we just celebrated the New Year, and Easter is here already.  Of course it is actually a bit early this year on March 31.  But that only means we have to be on our toes to be strategic for Easter to be a way to welcome newcomers, casual attendees and friends / family that might be visiting from our of town.

One of the easiest tactics almost any church can utilize to spread the word about Easter Sunday services is Facebook advertising.

Not only is it affordable since you actually set the bid and budget caps for your campaign — so your expenses won’t go wild and out of control.

But Facebook advertising is extremely effective in reaching friends of those that are attending your church already.  This is where leveraging social networks for church outreach messaging is perfect.

FACEBOOK ADVERTISING ALLOWS YOU TO TARGET VERY SPECIFIC DEMOGRAPHIC GROUPS

Here is an example of an ad I set-up today for Liquid Church’s Easter Services.  You’ll see that I’ve been able to set-up 3 demographic factors — People who live in the US, live in NJ in particular and who are 18 years or older.

Facebook Advertising for Easter Demographic Targeting

 

The interesting part is that you have even more control of who sees your ad — I added two additional parameters to this Facebook ad campaign:

  1. People who are NOT already connected to Liquid Church’s Facebook page.  I am setting up separate messaging (ad graphics, headline, ad copy and click through URL landing page) for people who are already fans of our Facebook page.  This ad is for people who have not LIKEd our Facebook page already.
  2. Only people who have friends that are connected to Liquid Church’s Facebook page.  So, here I’m not just targeting anyone in NJ over 18 that’s not part of our FB page community.  This parameter adds the social element.  Our ad will show up ONLY if they have a friend that has already LIKEd our church Facebook page.

By adding these two filters, I can leverage the fact that anyone seeing this ad has a chance of already hearing about Liquid Church from their friend (or their friend’s FB timeline feed) or at least has someone they know that knows about Liquid Church (because they’ve already liked our page).  

In a way, this ad is helping to seed the “invite a friend” behavior we hope our own community members are going to carry out over the next week or so.

FACEBOOK ADS ALLOW YOU TO TALK DIFFERENTLY TO YOUR OWN COMMUNITY MEMBERS

If you’re following along, you’ll now understand that your ads for your current attendees (we can assume these are basically the people who “LIKE” your Facebook page) can be a bit different.

In fact, here is an ad set-up that is intended for people who already know about Liquid Church and is a part of our Facebook community today:

Facebook ad for easter services

Instead of a generic “come to Easter services” type messaging, we have the ability to help equip our own people to invite their friends and family.  This can be done by sending click throughs to a page on your website that has downloadable content to share with their friends.  What would you put there?  Things like:

  • Video invitation from pastor with social sharing or forward to a friend email link
  • Facebook cover image people can use for the week
  • 1-step tweet links like this one: http://bit.ly/clicktotweetabouteaster2013 (TRY IT!)
  • Social sharing friendly videos about Easter like this one called social media Easter

 

Are you using Facebook Advertising for Easter promotion?  What questions do you have about using Facebook Ads for church?

nils-smith CBConlineToday’s post is from Nils Smith, who is the WebPastor at Community Bible Church in San Antonio, TX.  As WebPastor he oversees the entire web presence of CBC including CommunityBible.com, mobile app, Online Church, and all future developments online. Nils is also the author of The Social Media Guide for Ministry.  Connect with him here: Blog | Twitter | Book // I’ve asked him to boil down what he does on Facebook for CBC Online to some key tips that any church on Facebook could really benefit from.

5 Tips for Churches on Facebook

church-on-facebook-tips

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Did you know that 90% of users out there primary consume content.  While 9% curate it.  And only 1% create content.

If your nonprofit or church has a YouTube page, you are part of the rare breed of content creators.   But that’s not enough.  With 70 HOURS of video uploaded every single MINUTE, your audience needs your help.  The 90% — content consumers — are looking for content curators to help them sort through the millions of hours of video available today.

One way to do this on YouTube is via Playlists.

Instead of being presented with a random smattering of videos in your account (by upload date), your audience gets the chance to find sequences of videos that make sense and are related to each other.  The end result is better engagement with your content because they can go deeper, or discover new categories of video content that you offer.

Church YouTube Channel Playlist

 

YouTube’s playlist feature allows you to highlight sermon series, topical sets of videos, and more.  Here’s a glimpse at how to set a playlist up in YouTube according to their own help pages:

Set up a YouTube Playlist from the video watch page:

  1. Click the Add to button under the video you’re watching.
  2. From the drop down menu, type in the name of your new playlist and click the Create playlist button.
  3. You can choose if you want your playlist to be public (viewable by others) or private (only viewable by you).

From Video Manager:

  1. Sign into your account and click on your username in the upper right corner of your screen. Click on Video Manager in the expanded menu.
  2. Click on the Playlists tab on the left side of the screen.
  3. Click the +New Playlist button and enter in a Playlist title and description.
  4. Click Create Playlist.

Adding to an existing playlist:

  1. Click the arrow next to the Add to button under the video you’re watching.
  2. From the drop down menu, select the Playlist you want to add your video to.

Do you have playlists set-up on your YouTube channel?  Please feel free to list the link to your YouTube channel here so others can see some examples in action!

social media revolution

 

I’ve previously blogged about Erik Qualman’s Socialnomics book and work on “socialnomics” — here’s the latest version of his Social Media Revolution video for 2013:

What statistics stand out as you view the video? Drop a comment and your reflections here. I’d love to hear them.

Do you use your cell phone in church?

Is it encouraged or shunned in your church?

Churches that discourage cell phone use during church worship service

Westminster Presbyterian Church is part of the Presbytery of San Fernando in Burbank, CA. Prior to the service they actually showed this video of how they handle cell phones in church.

This is such a great topic because you’re probably firmly rooted one side or the other.  .  .

Either cell phones are a menace, to the preacher, to the people around you, and a distraction from the activity of worship itself OR it can be an amazing tool that augments the worship experience as well as empowering the congregation to be evangelistic *during* the actual service itself.  

What is interesting is that ministries like YouVersion have even explicitly built services to encourage smart phone usage in church.

Which side are you on?  Are smart phone cell phones something that should be allows in church? Share your comments below.

I’m excited to share with you that I’ll be speaking once again at the Redeemer Ei Forum conference April 5 & 6 in New York.  If you don’t know about the Center for Faith & Work at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, you really should.  It is an amazing ministry.

Within Redeemer’s CFW is the Entrepreneurship Initiative — which hosts an annual conference on Gospel Entrepreneurship.  They also run an annual business plan competition, where ventures run by christian entrepreneurs have a shot at awards up to $25,000 for their non-profit, for-profit or arts start-ups.  This year’s theme for the Ei Forum conference is RISK: Faith or Folly.  I’m looking forward to hearing Tim Keller’s reflections on how thoughtful christian entrepreneurs can consider risk in a faith and work integration framework.

Redeemer Presbyterian Church conference - Ei Forum April 2013

 

Here’s the blurb for my talk:

Risk and Rewards of PR & Social Media:

Do you feel the pressure to have a social media presence, but don’t know exactly how it will further your venture’s objectives? Are you a bit fuzzy about when your media campaigns are actually helping or hurting your cause? Strategic communications advisor Kenny Jahng will share concrete content marketing tactics at this year’s Ei Forum.  Kenny’s insights will help you reap the rewards while avoiding the risks involved with publicity campaigns for your venture.

 

Ei Forum conference details

 

Whether you can make it or not, what questions do you have about social media, PR and how you approach communications with the various audiences related to your organization?

In my marketing communications advisory of nonprofits and churches, I have increasingly been producing infographics for clients’ marketing campaigns. . . because they are effective and they just work in getting the word out.

When we create custom infographics for clients it usually takes about a week or so to turn them around and costs the client anywhere from $500-750 on average to produce.  The results have been phenomenal creating some powerful case studies for integrating visual media into anyone’s marketing communications campaigns.

But for those times where you want to produce a quick infographic, there are other resources out there like Piktochart which can produce interesting visual content for your blog or flyer or other smaller project.  Check out this quick video where you’ll see some screenshots of the menus inside the piktochart online service:

 

Just earlier this week, I published an infographic that I whipped up using this method:

 

infographic example

 

 

There is of course a learning curve to using the online infographic generator with it’s set of online toolbox because you want to control details of layouts, text placement, etc.

But to be truthful, the real challenge of infographic production is not the graphics but being able to use data in order to tell a story that is compelling.  That’s where the real value is when we create custom infographics for clients.  When we succeed, people get the message and are compelled share or follow the call to action in it.

But if you’re up for dabbling in infographic land in the short term, these online infographic tools are a decent beginning point.

 

Undoubtedly if your organization has a social media presence, you are leaning on your fans and followers to help spread the word. That’s one of the core reasons you are utilizing social media in the first place, right? To leverage the social networks of your supporters in order to reach new people that your organization doesn’t have an existing relationship with yet.

So you probably are asking your community to share your posts. To retweet and thumb up Like’s for your status updates. To +1 interesting content in your feed.

But have you explained to them WHY you want them to do it? More importantly have you shown them how their simple actions can help them be a part of the work your organization is doing?

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Check out this simple direct mail piece attempts to do with their community. Do you see how they are framing the opportunity for each of the thousands of people in the social media community?

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On the back, the larger than life number is shared in a way that invites the person to be a part of the plan.

How are you framing the WHY opportunity for your supporter base? Are you inviting them into the larger story or are you just drilling them with neverending requests to pimp out their personal social network for something where only your organization benefits?