Archives For Videos

horizontal-infographic These days we are inundated with options regarding social media platforms.

One of the mistakes newbies make is to think they all accomplish similar things and are used by everyone in general.

Knowing what each platform has a sweet spot for allows you to engage appropriately and spend your time wisely as you invest in various social media communities.

Here’s my latest take on some of the social media platforms being widely used today in 2014-2015: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, Flickr, Reddit, YouTube and others.
Social Media Home - Vertical

What would you add? What would you modify? I love hearing feedback and input on this kind of stuff. Please leave a comment below!

Digital Mission FieldAt every talk on social media these days, I point out that the big 4 search engines you need to pay attention to are: (1) Google (2) YouTube (3) Amazon (4) iTunes. Most people got the first, but underestimate YouTube and the others. While tweeting with Sean Cannell recently, I asked him to share some of his YouTube for Churches awesomeness with my readers. Sean is the Campus Pastor of The Church OC, co-founder of THiNK International, a Church Leadership Blog and well known YouTube channel, and Author of YouTube for Churches. Well, here it is — enjoy!

youtubeforchurches.com
YouTube is the most underrated and underutilized social network by church leaders and churches. Facebook is usually the priority, followed by Twitter or Instagram, with video hosting and sharing usually on Vimeo. If a church does have  a YouTube channel, it usually is an afterthought, not receiving the best energy of the creative staff or volunteer team.

I think our social media priorities are out of order.

What most church leaders don’t realize is that YouTube has almost as many unique monthly users as Facebook (over 1 billion), and is the 2nd largest search engine in the world, while being the  3rd most visited website in the world.

When it comes to reaching people with social media, YouTube is one of the most important platforms for churches and church leaders. This is true now, but will be even more true in the future with the accelerated growth of online video.

How is YouTube a mission field?
YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine in the world! That means 2nd only to Google, people are searching for answers to questions on YouTube. That is a huge opportunity for for churches and church leaders who have biblical answers to those questions.

Your church, your team, and you and your iPhone, have the opportunity to be on the other side of that search query!

YouTube can help you  practically reach people by helping your website rank higher and your church get discovered locally, BUT, beyond that, YouTube gives you access to a global audience to share the Gospel and answers to questions people are asking!

Using the YouTube Keyword Tool you easily can discover some of these questions. “Is God Real?” is searched 25,200 times a month. “Is Jesus God?” 50,000. The solo term “God” is searched over 5.3 million times a month! People are looking for answers to life’s biggest questions on the same website they watch viral cat videos on.

Don’t Wait, Start Using YouTube to Reach People!
Tapping into YouTube’s search power is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how it can be used by churches and church leaders.

So take YouTube seriously, make a plan and take action!

And if you are interested in a YouTube Crash Course, just go to YouTubeforChurches.com and you can access a free 4 video training series and a free ebook to help you save time, energy and get legit results with YouTube.

Keep crushing it,

Sean Cannell

p.s. Access a free 4 Video YouTube Training Course and eBook at youtubeforchurches.com

 

National Back To Church Messaging

Continue Reading…

Once in awhile you come upon communications execution that just hits the mark dead center.

Check out the fan celebration video published to this group’s YouTube channel:

So, who are these girls?

Sonia and Janice are Australian-born Korean twins who sing and post their cover performances on YouTube.   Their musical vids have gotten decent traction on YouTube.  Here’s an obligatory / I’m-lovin’-it example of their work:

And boy can they sing — over 1,000,000 people have subscribed to their channel that has only 38 videos so far.   Many of those videos have MILLIONS of views.  As much as over 20,000,000 views for a single video.

Wow.  So what’s the secret sauce to accruing so many subscribers?

See how the *directly* and *explicitly* engage with their fans on camera?  That’s a huge part of why they’ve gotten so much traction.

Take note: When they’re looking into the camera, they are talking to *you* — an individual — not the anonymous masses of fans that might be watching.  Even though this is a mass medium of communications, when you talk directly to the viewer (singular, not plural!), then you really have the chance to accomplish something — that’s make a connection.

Do you see the difference between broadcasting a generic message and delivering a personal message?  That’s how you do it.

Tell me what is keeping you from creating content like this where you are talking directly at the person watching?  I’d love to hear why your circumstances / brand / approach limits you from doing that.

Did you know that 90% of users out there primary consume content.  While 9% curate it.  And only 1% create content.

If your nonprofit or church has a YouTube page, you are part of the rare breed of content creators.   But that’s not enough.  With 70 HOURS of video uploaded every single MINUTE, your audience needs your help.  The 90% — content consumers — are looking for content curators to help them sort through the millions of hours of video available today.

One way to do this on YouTube is via Playlists.

Instead of being presented with a random smattering of videos in your account (by upload date), your audience gets the chance to find sequences of videos that make sense and are related to each other.  The end result is better engagement with your content because they can go deeper, or discover new categories of video content that you offer.

Church YouTube Channel Playlist

 

YouTube’s playlist feature allows you to highlight sermon series, topical sets of videos, and more.  Here’s a glimpse at how to set a playlist up in YouTube according to their own help pages:

Set up a YouTube Playlist from the video watch page:

  1. Click the Add to button under the video you’re watching.
  2. From the drop down menu, type in the name of your new playlist and click the Create playlist button.
  3. You can choose if you want your playlist to be public (viewable by others) or private (only viewable by you).

From Video Manager:

  1. Sign into your account and click on your username in the upper right corner of your screen. Click on Video Manager in the expanded menu.
  2. Click on the Playlists tab on the left side of the screen.
  3. Click the +New Playlist button and enter in a Playlist title and description.
  4. Click Create Playlist.

Adding to an existing playlist:

  1. Click the arrow next to the Add to button under the video you’re watching.
  2. From the drop down menu, select the Playlist you want to add your video to.

Do you have playlists set-up on your YouTube channel?  Please feel free to list the link to your YouTube channel here so others can see some examples in action!

social media revolution

 

I’ve previously blogged about Erik Qualman’s Socialnomics book and work on “socialnomics” — here’s the latest version of his Social Media Revolution video for 2013:

What statistics stand out as you view the video? Drop a comment and your reflections here. I’d love to hear them.

Have you started a 365 Project yet?  A photo-a-day? A blog-post-a-week?  A journal project?

These can be an amazing way to highlight the year at the end of the next year.  But you have to spend a few minutes this week to plan for the content when you need it in 11 months from now.

Planning year-end highlight videos now

 

Here’s a fun little video that my friends Sim & Bek just released — as you can tell, it was 9 months in the making.  BUT —  if you think about how they produced it, it is something anyone (even you! ha!) can execute on if you just plan it out in advance.

Take a looksie and I’ll join you further down the page after you watch the fun vid:

 

As of this post’s publishing they’ve already garnered over 1,000 video views.  Would you love that for any of your organization’s videos too?

All this creative couple needed was a still camera — an iPhone cam would do perfectly; a regular spot for the camera to sit; and a regular spot for Bek to stand when taking a couple of snaps each month.

If you review the video again, they only take 3-6 shots for any given milestone.  Easy-peasy!

The more important thing to think out now is the workflow — You can easily email the photos to yourself with the same subject line (easy to search for at the end of the year) or sync/transfer the photos into a project folder that you set up now.

At the end of the project, all you have to do then is simply import them into iMovie or Windows Movie Maker and overlay a track of music to fit the mood.  That’s it!

What kind of project could you create in 2013 if you started today?  Check out these fun photo-lapse videos to spark your creativity:

 

Imagine taking a photo a day of your staff at work in the office.  They can hold up ipads or printouts or chalkboard with whatever big project you’re working on that month?

What about a photo a week for every Sunday at your church?

Or have someone hold up signs that feature flyers / posters / marketing collateral featuring your monthly events, message series, etc.

A simple one is to create a simple sign that says “We HEART our volunteers” or “supporters” and then take snaps shots whenever you meet one anywhere.   The key here is that you have a sign or some other device that stays constant in all of the photos.

Do you launch customer projects all across the country?  Why not create simple signs that your sales force brings around and snaps with their customers?

Or get a small whiteboard and have people answer a fill in the blank statement that talks about something related to your mission.

Imagine a year-end review video flipping through the photos of all of these various series of photos.

 

All it takes is a simple snap of a photo TODAY to get things going!  Can you help me pick a project for myself?  Drop a comment here to suggest one!

Nanalew - Puppy's First Christmas Video on YouTube

Have you seen the latest trending viral YouTube video this Christmas season?

It’s a cute 96 second video against a 1 1/2 minute music track.  Short, simple, cute.  Perhaps people just want to watch anything other than Gangnam Style, but this is a sharable, watchable fun video in its own right.

Take a look:

You can easily see how this video has racked up 4.5 MILLION video views on YouTube, at least as of this post.

While viral videos can never be architected, there are a couple of things you can learn from this viral video and apply right now:

1) Timing.  Just like the timing of PR and any newsjacking piece you are employing, timing of content publishing is important.  This video tapped into the Christmastime season as well as the niche trend of families getting new puppies for the holidays.  The lesson here? Take your intended message, subject or idea and try to tie it thematically with a current trend, news piece or movement.  You’ll hopefully be able to harness the momentum others have already begun so that your video is not trying to depend on pick-up from scratch.

2) Short & Sweet Music Track. The mechanics of the actual video are quite simple.  While there a couple of moments that are timed to the actual song, most of the video clips used in the montage are simple and almost random cuts that anyone (like you!) can put together.  The key here is that they picked a short and sweet upbeat song to use as the backdrop of the video.  By using a music track as the basis for creating the video, it becomes a much easier task to assemble clips to fill in the parts of the song — vs — building a script from scratch, and then trying to source background music to fit / match the storyline. The lesson here?  Try planning a video project by using the music track as the constraint and see what happens.

3) Lots of different views.  Did you notice all the different camera angles, and varied ways the puppy was shot by the camera?  This video took one subject, one idea.  And then shot tons of various video clips of the subject (the puppy!).  This makes is relatively easy to shoot.  Are you shooting a volunteer celebration video?  Go out and shoot various scenes of your volunteers in action, high-fiving each other, working together, etc.  The lesson here?  Don’t make it super complicated and hard on yourself.  Find simple approaches in producing your film.

4) Just Publish.  If you look at Nanalew’s YouTube channel, this isn’t the only video produced and published this year.  In fact, once you start watching the other videos in the account, you’ll see that there a bunch that are nothing close to 4.5-million-view-worthiness.  The thing Nanalew understands is that the Internet rewards a bias for action when it comes to publishing content.  Many coaching clients I have worked with continue to look at web content as single-event, milestone-like publishing.  That’s what you did in the Gutenberg era.  But in the Google era, you want to be able to publish a *stream* of content so that your audience on the web can help lift up the winners.  That’s exactly what happend with PSY and his 1 Billion View Video.  He’s been a Korean pop-star for a decade, pumping out song after song.  It was the YouTube audience that decided to make Gangnam Style the king of web video.  The lesson here?  Stop planning on planning it out.  Just start the project and drive it to completion so you can publish it.  Remember you always have the option to take it down in the end.  But please, just publish.

What else can you see working with Puppy’s First Christmas video that might be applicable to videos for your organization, cause or campaign?