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5 Ideas for Using Google Plus Hangouts for Church Communities

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Good Use of QR Codes in Church

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Once in awhile you come upon communications execution that just hits the mark dead center.

Check out the fan celebration video published to this group’s YouTube channel:

So, who are these girls?

Sonia and Janice are Australian-born Korean twins who sing and post their cover performances on YouTube.   Their musical vids have gotten decent traction on YouTube.  Here’s an obligatory / I’m-lovin’-it example of their work:

And boy can they sing — over 1,000,000 people have subscribed to their channel that has only 38 videos so far.   Many of those videos have MILLIONS of views.  As much as over 20,000,000 views for a single video.

Wow.  So what’s the secret sauce to accruing so many subscribers?

See how the *directly* and *explicitly* engage with their fans on camera?  That’s a huge part of why they’ve gotten so much traction.

Take note: When they’re looking into the camera, they are talking to *you* — an individual — not the anonymous masses of fans that might be watching.  Even though this is a mass medium of communications, when you talk directly to the viewer (singular, not plural!), then you really have the chance to accomplish something — that’s make a connection.

Do you see the difference between broadcasting a generic message and delivering a personal message?  That’s how you do it.

Tell me what is keeping you from creating content like this where you are talking directly at the person watching?  I’d love to hear why your circumstances / brand / approach limits you from doing that.

It feels like we just celebrated the New Year, and Easter is here already.  Of course it is actually a bit early this year on March 31.  But that only means we have to be on our toes to be strategic for Easter to be a way to welcome newcomers, casual attendees and friends / family that might be visiting from our of town.

One of the easiest tactics almost any church can utilize to spread the word about Easter Sunday services is Facebook advertising.

Not only is it affordable since you actually set the bid and budget caps for your campaign — so your expenses won’t go wild and out of control.

But Facebook advertising is extremely effective in reaching friends of those that are attending your church already.  This is where leveraging social networks for church outreach messaging is perfect.

FACEBOOK ADVERTISING ALLOWS YOU TO TARGET VERY SPECIFIC DEMOGRAPHIC GROUPS

Here is an example of an ad I set-up today for Liquid Church’s Easter Services.  You’ll see that I’ve been able to set-up 3 demographic factors — People who live in the US, live in NJ in particular and who are 18 years or older.

Facebook Advertising for Easter Demographic Targeting

 

The interesting part is that you have even more control of who sees your ad — I added two additional parameters to this Facebook ad campaign:

  1. People who are NOT already connected to Liquid Church’s Facebook page.  I am setting up separate messaging (ad graphics, headline, ad copy and click through URL landing page) for people who are already fans of our Facebook page.  This ad is for people who have not LIKEd our Facebook page already.
  2. Only people who have friends that are connected to Liquid Church’s Facebook page.  So, here I’m not just targeting anyone in NJ over 18 that’s not part of our FB page community.  This parameter adds the social element.  Our ad will show up ONLY if they have a friend that has already LIKEd our church Facebook page.

By adding these two filters, I can leverage the fact that anyone seeing this ad has a chance of already hearing about Liquid Church from their friend (or their friend’s FB timeline feed) or at least has someone they know that knows about Liquid Church (because they’ve already liked our page).  

In a way, this ad is helping to seed the “invite a friend” behavior we hope our own community members are going to carry out over the next week or so.

FACEBOOK ADS ALLOW YOU TO TALK DIFFERENTLY TO YOUR OWN COMMUNITY MEMBERS

If you’re following along, you’ll now understand that your ads for your current attendees (we can assume these are basically the people who “LIKE” your Facebook page) can be a bit different.

In fact, here is an ad set-up that is intended for people who already know about Liquid Church and is a part of our Facebook community today:

Facebook ad for easter services

Instead of a generic “come to Easter services” type messaging, we have the ability to help equip our own people to invite their friends and family.  This can be done by sending click throughs to a page on your website that has downloadable content to share with their friends.  What would you put there?  Things like:

  • Video invitation from pastor with social sharing or forward to a friend email link
  • Facebook cover image people can use for the week
  • 1-step tweet links like this one: http://bit.ly/clicktotweetabouteaster2013 (TRY IT!)
  • Social sharing friendly videos about Easter like this one called social media Easter

 

Are you using Facebook Advertising for Easter promotion?  What questions do you have about using Facebook Ads for church?

nils-smith CBConlineToday’s post is from Nils Smith, who is the WebPastor at Community Bible Church in San Antonio, TX.  As WebPastor he oversees the entire web presence of CBC including CommunityBible.com, mobile app, Online Church, and all future developments online. Nils is also the author of The Social Media Guide for Ministry.  Connect with him here: Blog | Twitter | Book // I’ve asked him to boil down what he does on Facebook for CBC Online to some key tips that any church on Facebook could really benefit from.

5 Tips for Churches on Facebook

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So many times the core offering is great, but it falls on dead ears. Why?

Have you ever considered it was because the user experience was lacking?

What if you reinvented the *experience* you are delivering along with your core offering? Most likely, you haven’t paid as much attention to the “post-sale” experience as you do to the crafting of the core offering to your audience targets.

Check out these fast food reinventions of the user experience:

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When seeing these new environments, i was impressed. They woke up and realized they needed to consider the people they depend upon — their customers.

If McDonald’s and KFC can pay attention to the experience they offer and really consider how the customer engages with their brand, can’t you too?

What can you do to really ramp up the experience interacting with your organization?