Archives For mobile

3 Trends for 2013

 

 

My colleague Rich Birch over at UnSeminary.com has spotlighted 3 important trends ministry leaders need to watch out for in the coming year:

  1. Everything is going mobile – from announcements to giving to community participation to social sharing.  You need to open your eyes and see that everyone’s phone is more than just a phone.
  2. Compassion action – individuals in today’s culture want to change the world, not just sit and soak in the pews.  What are you doing to help your people fulfill the call for mercy and justice beyond the walls of your building?  Whether it be down the block or around the world, the opportunity is here and now.
  3. Data can drive everything The Church is known for being stuck in the Gutenberg world while everything else has raced ahead into the Google world. If you start to look at some simple data about your people, about what’s happening, you can respond and provide better environments for discipleship, better engagement with your community, better experiences for visitors.  Forget about the fancy shmancy stuff. 38% of church leaders reading this don’t even have a church website in 2012.  Heck, if you can budget just $2000 and I’ll build you a clean basic one just to get something up on the web.

What other trends do you think we’ll see in 2013? 

QR codes are those 2D square black and white bar codes that are popping up in different places.  First they were used in manufacturing and UPS started using them for tracking of packages before they were embraced by the retail & marketing community.

Now you’ll find them on posters, brochures, and stickers. . . These days, they are popping up in printed materials of various church communications.  You probably have seen one — since over 50% of the population supposedly has seen or knows what a QR code is at this point.

The big question is are we at the tipping point yet for QR code adoption? Or is this just a passing fad?

Are the ones using QR codes right now trying to force geeky hipness into daily routines while there is still some notable friction in using them?

Well, according to a couple of recent studies, it isn’t so clear.  Here’s two specific data points that might make you think again about QR codes:

Less than 1/3 of people have actually scanned in a QR code.  28%.  Yup, that’s it.  That’s not a huge percentage of people.


And if you look at the actual usage patterns of people who do scan QR codes, the data is not in favor of this hip tech trend amongst communicators to use it.  After all the native cell phone camera applications don’t recognize QR codes yet.  You have to proactively download a QR code reader, launch it and then scan the code.  This can take a couple of minutes and in all that time, you have no idea what you’ll find once the QR code is decoded by your app.  Is it a promo code?  A website?  A call to action?  Just another big fat advertisement?

The other practical downside is that you have to remember — while QR codes are small, they are usually placed in what is typically considered valuable real estate on the actual marketing collateral piece.  Is it worth utilizing such precious space for something that most people who see it won’t actually use?

That said, it really depends on the audience whether or not it is useful.  In a way, the church community is one place where adoption could be successful if you are intentional about both promotion of QR codes as well as what is delivered to the audience once it is scanned.   Because the church assembles on a regular basis, and there’s recurring publications (like the bulletin!) that are published, QR codes do lend itself to this type of environment where once you expose and train people to use it once, the chances of long-term adoption are high.

Paul Steinbrueck over at OurChurch.com suggestions 10 different ways for ministries to integrate QR codes into their communications practices.  One of my favorites from the list is #3 – where you use QR codes to link to media offerings that delve deeper into the subject of the sermon, or offer sermon notes or recordings for on-demand playback.  The other one worth considering is integrating them into event invitations so that they are easily passed along and the landing page has details, maps, directions for the event you are promoting.

QUESTION: Have you EVER scanned a QR code?  When was the last time you actually spotted one?