Archives For pinterest

horizontal-infographic These days we are inundated with options regarding social media platforms.

One of the mistakes newbies make is to think they all accomplish similar things and are used by everyone in general.

Knowing what each platform has a sweet spot for allows you to engage appropriately and spend your time wisely as you invest in various social media communities.

Here’s my latest take on some of the social media platforms being widely used today in 2014-2015: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, Flickr, Reddit, YouTube and others.
Social Media Home - Vertical

What would you add? What would you modify? I love hearing feedback and input on this kind of stuff. Please leave a comment below!

 

Pinterest Pinboards of Churches

 

One of the last social media platforms for churches to consider is Pinterest.  Several months ago, when I took a look at compiling a complete list of churches using Pinterest as a part of their social media communications toolset, there weren’t that many to list.  My twitter buddy @djchuang also took a swipe at listing churches on Pinterest recently you should be aware of.

But there’s plenty of reasons why Pinterest is something all churches should take a look at.  Here are some of them:

  • The average Pinterest user says on the site for 98 minutes per month. That’s more than 1.5 hours to capture their attention.
  • 20% of all US women are on Pinterest.  And 80% of Pinterest users are women. Guess who also typically makes the decision for which church to attend in a given family?
  • Pinterest users SHARE content – 80% of pins are shared content.
  • Unbelievable growth – From 9/2012 to 9/2013, there was a 60% growth in web traffic referrals.
  • 4.8% of Americans are using Pinterest at work.

Today, there’s a bunch more that have jumped on the bandwagon.  Take a look below at the 150+ churches with Pinterest accounts and active on the platform:

Complete Updated List of Churches on Pinterest

Continue Reading…

Pinterest is an image sharing social media platform that helps companies connect with their target audience. Non profit organizations can use it to promote their campaign and collect money from donors. I’ve blogged about churches starting to use Pinterest before.  In this guest post, I have asked Hema Gupta to discuss some of the techniques for driving online traffic towards a non profit website. If you are interested in submitting a guest post, please review the guidelines

Pinterest used by non-profits
We have social media networks like Facebook and Twitter for business promotion, then why Pinterest? Facebook fan page and Twitter connections bring clients, yet Pinterest is creating a buzz among social media lovers and corporates alike. The image sharing, intuitive and bright UI of this latest social media network gives it an edge over its contenders.
While Pinterest is growing rapidly and people love this image sharing platform, business houses have not explored its full potential yet. It’s quite surprising that non-profit organizations are not using this platform for promotion and fund raising, and missing a huge opportunity to reach millions of donors.
If you are wondering how an image sharing (rather pinning!) website can help the serious cause of a non-profit organization, here is how:
Creating Brand Identity and Spreading the Issue- This site is used by millions of users all over the world. Therefore, when you post something, it captures global attention. If you run a NGO, pin relevant images, documentaries and reports. Pinterest users may click on the glossy and happy photographs more often than dark and gloomy ones, but when an image is soul touching, users are bound to notice it.
  • We all know a picture can spell a thousand words and break the boundaries of social-cultural differences. When you post an image of a nuclear disaster or a child refugee, it grabs immediate attention. It creates curiosity among viewers and they will probably visit your site to know more about your organization. However, it is important not to present your organization as needy. Tell the story behind each photograph and highlight the solution so that people can help you in your mission.
  • Showing What You Do- People love a brand that has a human face. When you show the logo and ask people to donate money, it may not appeal to them. Instead of displaying a corporate image, upload some pictures of your organization’s work. Show what the volunteers are doing on the field, how you are fighting against pollution/poverty or anything else. Make people believe in your work so they understand that their contributions won’t go intro wrong hands.
  • Fundraising Prospects- Pinterest can be used to drive the “social” traffic to your website for better income. If you want to sell goods for charity, create an e-shop page and collect money for your campaign.
You can also use this site as a monitoring tool and shape future strategies. Take a look at the items people are pining from your site, where they are sharing it and the discussions about those pins. Following this strategy, you can get an idea of your brand perception and plan the future campaign promotions accordingly.
Pinterest has really opened a new door of possibilities for all types of businesses. All you need to do is set your own path and make the voice of your non profit’s mission heard.
Hema Gupta is an accredited social media marketing expert at Webguru India. She often likes to write contents on several subjects regarding website design, search engine optimization and social media updates during her free time. For more information she suggests to visiting here.

Pinterest Pinboards of Churches
Recently, I pointed out that Pinterest is prime for churches to embrace and start pinning.  If you do it right, there’s potential to generate word of mouth and traffic to your church website.

Here is a complete list of churches that have a presence on Pinterest:

Denomination Pinterest Pinners:
  • http://pinterest.com/presbyterianusa/ PC (USA)
As you can tell, there really aren’t a ton of churches that have hopped onto the Pinterest platform yet.  (Actually there are — but a lot of them are still with zero pins, no photos, no profile photos, no descriptions, etc.  I didn’t include those in this list above.)
I think a big reason for this is that most church communications people that have thought about getting onto Pinterest haven’t really figured out what you’re supposed do on Pinterest if you are representing a church.
Strategically, there’s a bunch of things you should consider pinning in order to gain exposure and start engaging with your community.  I’ll share more of the details for some of this soon, but here’s a category list to get you started:
  • Help prospective visitors figure out your church — take photos that help propsective visitors know what they’ll encounter if they come to visit.  Take photos of your worship environment, your fellowship hall, kids ministry rooms, bathrooms, parking, offices, people, greeters, worship services, etc.
  • Illustrate a dynamic church life — events, neat photo angles of various parts of your building, staff, leaders, etc.
  • Show your links to partner organizations — any organizations you work with, partner with or serve
  • Collect sermon / discipleship content — Books, resources, your sermon notes, scripture references.
  • Become the #1 advocate for living in your town — the church should become the advocate for living where you are.  Become the tour guide, the local expert, the concierge that shows up all the nook and cranny goodness of the city and surrounding towns you live in.  This means pinboards for restaurants, professional services, sports, schools, annual events & festivals, and more.

Do you know of any churches that have a Pinterest presence (with at least ONE pin please!)?   Please leave the name, location and URL in the comments below.

Pinterest is taking the social media scene by storm.

The platform’s users are overwhelmingly women (90%!) as of now. In 5 months, the has gained over 15 million new users.  WOW.

One of the stats that stand out about typical Pinterest behavior that speaks into the potential from a word of mouth marketing perspective is that 80% of of the content on Pinterest is shared content — that’s the essence of what social media is about.   Contrast this with Twitter users, where only 1.4% of the content is passed along (via Retweeting) by other users.

What to make of this?  It means that the chances of content to spread has huge potential on Pinterest.

The mad rush from business is taking place as new teaching content starts to emerge about how to take advantage of the traffic referrals that can happen with content introduced to the Pinterest ecosystem.

Take a look at this infographic that shares some of the interesting aspects of the Pinterest social media platform:

Infographic on Pinterest Basics

The question that arises of course is, what about the church? Can Pinterest be seen as an effective vehicle for church marketing?

I’ve been spending time on Pinterest over the last several weeks now and have started to formalize some approaches for sharing content which in turn drives traffic to the site where the images were originally picked-up.  I hope to share some of these practices in the near future here.

But in the meantime, here is a round-up of various posts that have started to explore how Pinterest might be relevant to church communications: