Archives For video

horizontal-infographic These days we are inundated with options regarding social media platforms.

One of the mistakes newbies make is to think they all accomplish similar things and are used by everyone in general.

Knowing what each platform has a sweet spot for allows you to engage appropriately and spend your time wisely as you invest in various social media communities.

Here’s my latest take on some of the social media platforms being widely used today in 2014-2015: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, Flickr, Reddit, YouTube and others.
Social Media Home - Vertical

What would you add? What would you modify? I love hearing feedback and input on this kind of stuff. Please leave a comment below!

social media revolution

 

I’ve previously blogged about Erik Qualman’s Socialnomics book and work on “socialnomics” — here’s the latest version of his Social Media Revolution video for 2013:

What statistics stand out as you view the video? Drop a comment and your reflections here. I’d love to hear them.

Have you started a 365 Project yet?  A photo-a-day? A blog-post-a-week?  A journal project?

These can be an amazing way to highlight the year at the end of the next year.  But you have to spend a few minutes this week to plan for the content when you need it in 11 months from now.

Planning year-end highlight videos now

 

Here’s a fun little video that my friends Sim & Bek just released — as you can tell, it was 9 months in the making.  BUT —  if you think about how they produced it, it is something anyone (even you! ha!) can execute on if you just plan it out in advance.

Take a looksie and I’ll join you further down the page after you watch the fun vid:

 

As of this post’s publishing they’ve already garnered over 1,000 video views.  Would you love that for any of your organization’s videos too?

All this creative couple needed was a still camera — an iPhone cam would do perfectly; a regular spot for the camera to sit; and a regular spot for Bek to stand when taking a couple of snaps each month.

If you review the video again, they only take 3-6 shots for any given milestone.  Easy-peasy!

The more important thing to think out now is the workflow — You can easily email the photos to yourself with the same subject line (easy to search for at the end of the year) or sync/transfer the photos into a project folder that you set up now.

At the end of the project, all you have to do then is simply import them into iMovie or Windows Movie Maker and overlay a track of music to fit the mood.  That’s it!

What kind of project could you create in 2013 if you started today?  Check out these fun photo-lapse videos to spark your creativity:

 

Imagine taking a photo a day of your staff at work in the office.  They can hold up ipads or printouts or chalkboard with whatever big project you’re working on that month?

What about a photo a week for every Sunday at your church?

Or have someone hold up signs that feature flyers / posters / marketing collateral featuring your monthly events, message series, etc.

A simple one is to create a simple sign that says “We HEART our volunteers” or “supporters” and then take snaps shots whenever you meet one anywhere.   The key here is that you have a sign or some other device that stays constant in all of the photos.

Do you launch customer projects all across the country?  Why not create simple signs that your sales force brings around and snaps with their customers?

Or get a small whiteboard and have people answer a fill in the blank statement that talks about something related to your mission.

Imagine a year-end review video flipping through the photos of all of these various series of photos.

 

All it takes is a simple snap of a photo TODAY to get things going!  Can you help me pick a project for myself?  Drop a comment here to suggest one!

Looking back at 2012, the USA Olympic Swim Team contributed to one of the biggest social media sharing phenomenons with their Call Me Maybe mashup parody video.  It wasn’t just a blip and was of course included in the international coverage of the Games, but 10 million video views later, the video is an example of something else that’s happening — video as a form of content publishing for the masses has gone mainstream.

Call Me Maybe Social Media Viral Video

 

The genius of these cover videos of pop music hits is that they are actually really easy to script, record and publish.  In fact, if you think about it, you could take various people in your organization and create an end of year video in this style that’s enjoyable and relatively easy to pull off.  The result is that you really put on display all of the parts of Check out what the team at Wheaton College did with their Merry Christmas video message.  I love the simplicity and the fact that they used this format to put on display the various parts campus life and departments who make it all happen all year long.

For an institutional end of year video message, I thought this was one of the more fun and engaging executions of the year-end message.  It sure beats the staid “From all of us at _________, we wish you a safe and joyous holiday with your family. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!” type message, doesn’t it? Face it, those just get deleted as soon as they are opened.

The only thing I would change is for someone at Wheaton to upload it to YouTube instead of Vimeo and secure a Google Non-Profit Grant so they can put a donate link at the end of the video (HELLO WHEATON — if you’re reading this, contact me directly and I can help make this happen).

You could even take the cue from Wheaton and recreate this same music video with your own team singing the various parts of the song, right?  Are the various people on your teams going through your head right now?

What about creating one that features all of the various volunteers and/or donors that support your organization? And if you’re able to plan just a bit, you can bring a video camera to various groups activities throughout the year to sing parts of the song in order to assemble your very own blockbuster video at the end of next year for Christmas 2013.

If song isn’t your thing, what about reading a poem, or a famous passage in this style on camera?  As you can see, there are many possibilities for creating a short, but engaging video like this.

Can you see your own group produce a simple year end video like this?  What is keeping you from making that dream — what you have in your head right now — a reality?

 

In terms of content marketing, videos are “the new black”.

If you’re on the web, you want to attract the attention of as many new people as possible. And you already know that if you’re producing content for the web, video needs to be a part of the mix.

YouTube Viral Videos in Church Marketing

The question is, just how long is the ideal video length?

90 seconds?

3 minutes?

4 minutes?

10 minutes?

Popular notion has been that you want something definitely under 5 minutes if you want it to be shared and spread across various social networks.  Attention spans just aren’t that long.  While the average online video viewed is 6 minutes 14 seconds, if you look at the most shared videos on YouTube you get a different story: Continue Reading…

This is one of the silliest TED.com videos ever.

But it’s one of the most impactful ever because it is so dead-simple, yet it works.

Get ready to repeat these two magical words as you watch the video:

SHAKE

FOLD

I love the reasoning for shaking 12 times. Why 12? Because the number 12 —  is the biggest number with just one syllable. HA!

The best part?  It really really works!  It’s kind of amazing that you can get dry hands with just one sheet of paper towel.

It’s mind boggling that if we can get down to 1 towel per person over the course of a year = 571,230,000 lbs of paper saved.  Wow.

Will you try the SHAKE & FOLD yourself?  Please let me know by dropping a quick comment below.

 

 

Innovation and creativity require dismantling assumptions and rebuilding assertions.  It means deconstruction before recollection.  Imagining while while refashioning.  What are you doing to that end in your work? In your art?

Kinetic Typography — that’s the official name of the motion graphics you’ve been seeing pop up all over the net these days. It’s powerful when done right.

Now you’ve seen a lot of great motion graphics on the web. Here’s one example to set frame of reference:

But there’s a specific flavor of motion graphics that deals with moving typography. Temporal typography to be more specific. And here, we have something called KINETIC TYPOGRAPHY which is produced by a new type of creative producer called a kinetic typographer these days. So get ready for more kinetic typography in the months and years to come.

Here’s some examples of great kinetic typography I’ve seen recently. And a big bang at the end.

And finally, we’re also seeing some of this format being applied within ministry media applications. I’ve included a fabulous one as the last one in this listing below as a “TRUER & BETTER” final example. . .

. . .

And finally, the true and better example featuring words of truth by Rev. Tim Keller by Peter Artemenko:


Do you know of any other examples of amazing motion graphics – kinetic typography? Share a URL below!