Archives For youtube

horizontal-infographic These days we are inundated with options regarding social media platforms.

One of the mistakes newbies make is to think they all accomplish similar things and are used by everyone in general.

Knowing what each platform has a sweet spot for allows you to engage appropriately and spend your time wisely as you invest in various social media communities.

Here’s my latest take on some of the social media platforms being widely used today in 2014-2015: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, Flickr, Reddit, YouTube and others.
Social Media Home - Vertical

What would you add? What would you modify? I love hearing feedback and input on this kind of stuff. Please leave a comment below!

Digital Mission FieldAt every talk on social media these days, I point out that the big 4 search engines you need to pay attention to are: (1) Google (2) YouTube (3) Amazon (4) iTunes. Most people got the first, but underestimate YouTube and the others. While tweeting with Sean Cannell recently, I asked him to share some of his YouTube for Churches awesomeness with my readers. Sean is the Campus Pastor of The Church OC, co-founder of THiNK International, a Church Leadership Blog and well known YouTube channel, and Author of YouTube for Churches. Well, here it is — enjoy!

youtubeforchurches.com
YouTube is the most underrated and underutilized social network by church leaders and churches. Facebook is usually the priority, followed by Twitter or Instagram, with video hosting and sharing usually on Vimeo. If a church does have  a YouTube channel, it usually is an afterthought, not receiving the best energy of the creative staff or volunteer team.

I think our social media priorities are out of order.

What most church leaders don’t realize is that YouTube has almost as many unique monthly users as Facebook (over 1 billion), and is the 2nd largest search engine in the world, while being the  3rd most visited website in the world.

When it comes to reaching people with social media, YouTube is one of the most important platforms for churches and church leaders. This is true now, but will be even more true in the future with the accelerated growth of online video.

How is YouTube a mission field?
YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine in the world! That means 2nd only to Google, people are searching for answers to questions on YouTube. That is a huge opportunity for for churches and church leaders who have biblical answers to those questions.

Your church, your team, and you and your iPhone, have the opportunity to be on the other side of that search query!

YouTube can help you  practically reach people by helping your website rank higher and your church get discovered locally, BUT, beyond that, YouTube gives you access to a global audience to share the Gospel and answers to questions people are asking!

Using the YouTube Keyword Tool you easily can discover some of these questions. “Is God Real?” is searched 25,200 times a month. “Is Jesus God?” 50,000. The solo term “God” is searched over 5.3 million times a month! People are looking for answers to life’s biggest questions on the same website they watch viral cat videos on.

Don’t Wait, Start Using YouTube to Reach People!
Tapping into YouTube’s search power is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how it can be used by churches and church leaders.

So take YouTube seriously, make a plan and take action!

And if you are interested in a YouTube Crash Course, just go to YouTubeforChurches.com and you can access a free 4 video training series and a free ebook to help you save time, energy and get legit results with YouTube.

Keep crushing it,

Sean Cannell

p.s. Access a free 4 Video YouTube Training Course and eBook at youtubeforchurches.com

 

Once in awhile you come upon communications execution that just hits the mark dead center.

Check out the fan celebration video published to this group’s YouTube channel:

So, who are these girls?

Sonia and Janice are Australian-born Korean twins who sing and post their cover performances on YouTube.   Their musical vids have gotten decent traction on YouTube.  Here’s an obligatory / I’m-lovin’-it example of their work:

And boy can they sing — over 1,000,000 people have subscribed to their channel that has only 38 videos so far.   Many of those videos have MILLIONS of views.  As much as over 20,000,000 views for a single video.

Wow.  So what’s the secret sauce to accruing so many subscribers?

See how the *directly* and *explicitly* engage with their fans on camera?  That’s a huge part of why they’ve gotten so much traction.

Take note: When they’re looking into the camera, they are talking to *you* — an individual — not the anonymous masses of fans that might be watching.  Even though this is a mass medium of communications, when you talk directly to the viewer (singular, not plural!), then you really have the chance to accomplish something — that’s make a connection.

Do you see the difference between broadcasting a generic message and delivering a personal message?  That’s how you do it.

Tell me what is keeping you from creating content like this where you are talking directly at the person watching?  I’d love to hear why your circumstances / brand / approach limits you from doing that.

Did you know that 90% of users out there primary consume content.  While 9% curate it.  And only 1% create content.

If your nonprofit or church has a YouTube page, you are part of the rare breed of content creators.   But that’s not enough.  With 70 HOURS of video uploaded every single MINUTE, your audience needs your help.  The 90% — content consumers — are looking for content curators to help them sort through the millions of hours of video available today.

One way to do this on YouTube is via Playlists.

Instead of being presented with a random smattering of videos in your account (by upload date), your audience gets the chance to find sequences of videos that make sense and are related to each other.  The end result is better engagement with your content because they can go deeper, or discover new categories of video content that you offer.

Church YouTube Channel Playlist

 

YouTube’s playlist feature allows you to highlight sermon series, topical sets of videos, and more.  Here’s a glimpse at how to set a playlist up in YouTube according to their own help pages:

Set up a YouTube Playlist from the video watch page:

  1. Click the Add to button under the video you’re watching.
  2. From the drop down menu, type in the name of your new playlist and click the Create playlist button.
  3. You can choose if you want your playlist to be public (viewable by others) or private (only viewable by you).

From Video Manager:

  1. Sign into your account and click on your username in the upper right corner of your screen. Click on Video Manager in the expanded menu.
  2. Click on the Playlists tab on the left side of the screen.
  3. Click the +New Playlist button and enter in a Playlist title and description.
  4. Click Create Playlist.

Adding to an existing playlist:

  1. Click the arrow next to the Add to button under the video you’re watching.
  2. From the drop down menu, select the Playlist you want to add your video to.

Do you have playlists set-up on your YouTube channel?  Please feel free to list the link to your YouTube channel here so others can see some examples in action!

Nanalew - Puppy's First Christmas Video on YouTube

Have you seen the latest trending viral YouTube video this Christmas season?

It’s a cute 96 second video against a 1 1/2 minute music track.  Short, simple, cute.  Perhaps people just want to watch anything other than Gangnam Style, but this is a sharable, watchable fun video in its own right.

Take a look:

You can easily see how this video has racked up 4.5 MILLION video views on YouTube, at least as of this post.

While viral videos can never be architected, there are a couple of things you can learn from this viral video and apply right now:

1) Timing.  Just like the timing of PR and any newsjacking piece you are employing, timing of content publishing is important.  This video tapped into the Christmastime season as well as the niche trend of families getting new puppies for the holidays.  The lesson here? Take your intended message, subject or idea and try to tie it thematically with a current trend, news piece or movement.  You’ll hopefully be able to harness the momentum others have already begun so that your video is not trying to depend on pick-up from scratch.

2) Short & Sweet Music Track. The mechanics of the actual video are quite simple.  While there a couple of moments that are timed to the actual song, most of the video clips used in the montage are simple and almost random cuts that anyone (like you!) can put together.  The key here is that they picked a short and sweet upbeat song to use as the backdrop of the video.  By using a music track as the basis for creating the video, it becomes a much easier task to assemble clips to fill in the parts of the song — vs — building a script from scratch, and then trying to source background music to fit / match the storyline. The lesson here?  Try planning a video project by using the music track as the constraint and see what happens.

3) Lots of different views.  Did you notice all the different camera angles, and varied ways the puppy was shot by the camera?  This video took one subject, one idea.  And then shot tons of various video clips of the subject (the puppy!).  This makes is relatively easy to shoot.  Are you shooting a volunteer celebration video?  Go out and shoot various scenes of your volunteers in action, high-fiving each other, working together, etc.  The lesson here?  Don’t make it super complicated and hard on yourself.  Find simple approaches in producing your film.

4) Just Publish.  If you look at Nanalew’s YouTube channel, this isn’t the only video produced and published this year.  In fact, once you start watching the other videos in the account, you’ll see that there a bunch that are nothing close to 4.5-million-view-worthiness.  The thing Nanalew understands is that the Internet rewards a bias for action when it comes to publishing content.  Many coaching clients I have worked with continue to look at web content as single-event, milestone-like publishing.  That’s what you did in the Gutenberg era.  But in the Google era, you want to be able to publish a *stream* of content so that your audience on the web can help lift up the winners.  That’s exactly what happend with PSY and his 1 Billion View Video.  He’s been a Korean pop-star for a decade, pumping out song after song.  It was the YouTube audience that decided to make Gangnam Style the king of web video.  The lesson here?  Stop planning on planning it out.  Just start the project and drive it to completion so you can publish it.  Remember you always have the option to take it down in the end.  But please, just publish.

What else can you see working with Puppy’s First Christmas video that might be applicable to videos for your organization, cause or campaign?

Looking back at 2012, the USA Olympic Swim Team contributed to one of the biggest social media sharing phenomenons with their Call Me Maybe mashup parody video.  It wasn’t just a blip and was of course included in the international coverage of the Games, but 10 million video views later, the video is an example of something else that’s happening — video as a form of content publishing for the masses has gone mainstream.

Call Me Maybe Social Media Viral Video

 

The genius of these cover videos of pop music hits is that they are actually really easy to script, record and publish.  In fact, if you think about it, you could take various people in your organization and create an end of year video in this style that’s enjoyable and relatively easy to pull off.  The result is that you really put on display all of the parts of Check out what the team at Wheaton College did with their Merry Christmas video message.  I love the simplicity and the fact that they used this format to put on display the various parts campus life and departments who make it all happen all year long.

For an institutional end of year video message, I thought this was one of the more fun and engaging executions of the year-end message.  It sure beats the staid “From all of us at _________, we wish you a safe and joyous holiday with your family. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!” type message, doesn’t it? Face it, those just get deleted as soon as they are opened.

The only thing I would change is for someone at Wheaton to upload it to YouTube instead of Vimeo and secure a Google Non-Profit Grant so they can put a donate link at the end of the video (HELLO WHEATON — if you’re reading this, contact me directly and I can help make this happen).

You could even take the cue from Wheaton and recreate this same music video with your own team singing the various parts of the song, right?  Are the various people on your teams going through your head right now?

What about creating one that features all of the various volunteers and/or donors that support your organization? And if you’re able to plan just a bit, you can bring a video camera to various groups activities throughout the year to sing parts of the song in order to assemble your very own blockbuster video at the end of next year for Christmas 2013.

If song isn’t your thing, what about reading a poem, or a famous passage in this style on camera?  As you can see, there are many possibilities for creating a short, but engaging video like this.

Can you see your own group produce a simple year end video like this?  What is keeping you from making that dream — what you have in your head right now — a reality?

 

In terms of content marketing, videos are “the new black”.

If you’re on the web, you want to attract the attention of as many new people as possible. And you already know that if you’re producing content for the web, video needs to be a part of the mix.

YouTube Viral Videos in Church Marketing

The question is, just how long is the ideal video length?

90 seconds?

3 minutes?

4 minutes?

10 minutes?

Popular notion has been that you want something definitely under 5 minutes if you want it to be shared and spread across various social networks.  Attention spans just aren’t that long.  While the average online video viewed is 6 minutes 14 seconds, if you look at the most shared videos on YouTube you get a different story: Continue Reading…

A great tactic to mobilize your fan base to further awareness is to sponsor a video contest.  There are many ways to judge a video contest, but if you’re trying to get your supporters to spread the word as much as possible, video views is usually a big part of any formula to select a winner.

In my last post, I had Deric share 7 practical video marketing tactics to gain thousands of video views.

Now it’s my turn to put it into action since I have entered to win a contest by the author of this upcoming book, The Pumpkin Plan.  The contest entails making a YouTube video spotlighting “your inner critic” – that negative voice inside your head that keeps you from going out and executing.  The winner will be judged on video views, social sharing and some judges’ personal criteria.

So I made a quick video by recording short intro and outros and getting a outlandish character to play the “inner critic” — meet plastic bag man:

[SIDE NOTE] Let’s explain a little what this book marketing video is about: Mike Michalowicz has written an entrepreneurship book called The Pumpkin Plan.  Yes, it is a business book, but what might get missed is that much of the core lessons are totally applicable in the non-profit world:

  • Plant the right seeds: Don’t waste time doing a bunch of different things just to please any every type of customers supporters or target beneficiary client out there. Identify the thing you do better than anyone else and focus your company organization doing it.  Who do you serve the best?  Who would appreciate what you do the most?
  • Weed out the losers: In a pumpkin patch small, rotten pumpkins stunt the growth of the robust, healthy ones. The same is true with who you are trying to target with your non-profit activities. Figure out which target audience that adds the most value and provides the best opportunities for sustained growth. Then ditch the worst of the worst.
  • Nurture the winners: Once you figure out who your best customers supporters are, blow their minds with care. Discover their unfulfilled needs, innovate to help make their wishes come true, and overdeliver on every single promise of being an effective organization against your mission.

Now, back to the task of the winning the video contest…

Outside of the 7 marketingtips for video marketing, there’s a bunch of other tactics I’ll be employing to get the word out about this video:

  • Submit the video page to the top social bookmarking sites.  Digg, StumbleUpon, Reddit, etc. etc. This can be tedious if you’re doing everything manually.  Luckily there are some semi-automated methods for submitting to multiple social bookmarking platforms.
  • Comment on relevant blog posts that talk about the inner critic, inertia, discouragement that many entrepreneurs face with a link back to the video.  The key is to tap into the perfect audience for the book/video.
  • Blog about the video on my blogs — the making of it, the process to post it, just like I’m doing now.  It adds a different dimension to traffic being attracted to watch the video.  SEO factor also helps to gain different audiences across the web.
  • Video replies — use the video to reply back to other vloggers talking about the same topic from different viewpoints.
  • Make custom business cards with a promo URL.  Of course the URL will be a shortcut one so people can easily remember and type it in if needed.  Because printing is so cheap these days, like…$15 for 250 2-sided, full-color business cards, including shipping!
  • Adjust the video title and description so that they are optimized for specific keyword phrases.  Just like Title Tags for SEO, video titles and description copy really matter.  YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine, so if you are careful with your web copywriting, you might become a winner.

If I have the time to turn on all these options, my video will be the sure winner.  Of course the question comes down to how much energy I should/want/will spend on this.

What other ways do you promote videos online?  Any outlandish, yet undiscovered tip you can share?

 

 

Video marketing and video seo are hot right now.  It’s one of the most effective tactics to focus upon regarding your online marketing mix, at least for the next 12-18 months.  One non-profit that has had great initial success implementing simple strategies to promote their video is led by Deric Milligan whom I have known from the Redeemer Entrepreneurship Initiative community.  It has been great to see Deric go from zero to sixty over the last several years with his diligence in learning best practices and simply executing on them.  Enjoy today’s post about how he’s focusing on video marketing these days.

Inheritance of Hope // Deric MilliganDeric Milligan’s life was changed drastically in 2003 when his wife, Kristen, was diagnosed with stage 4 liver cancer.  Apart from his time-consuming role as caregiver, he felt led to alter his professional aspirations.  Deric and Kristen founded Inheritance of Hope in 2007, and after completing an MBA (with distinction) from New York University’s Stern School of Business, Deric became the Executive Director of Inheritance of Hope.  His passion is for serving and supporting families like his; young families living with a parent battling a life-threatening illness.


The organization I co-founded with my wife, Inheritance of Hope, recently celebrated its 5th birthday.

To mark the occasion, we released a short video about the organization and its ministry to young families living with a terminally ill parent.  We worked hard to create a video that captured the heart of our mission and was “remarkable.”  Check it out here! :http://youtu.be/GoHl9XZSVQk

 

YouTube Video Marketing Tips and Tactics

These are 7 specific strategies we implemented to get more than 3,000 YouTube views in the first week:

1)     We created a short version “teaser” of the video to stimulate interest two weeks before the release date.  We released the short version through our monthly e-newsletter and made sure our audience knew to look for the full version on its release date.

2)     We released an email blast to our subscribers early on the release date with nothing more than the link to the video.   The only action they could take after opening the email was to click on the video.  We have also found that putting the word “video” in the subject line improves our open rates.  With an effective subject line and a clear call to action, our clickthrough rates were significantly higher than our monthly e-newsletter.

3)     We sent targeted emails to key supporters, volunteers, and past participants telling them to look for the video and asking them to share it with their friends.  We gave specific instructions about how they could share it (Facebook, forward the email, share via YouTube).

4)     We asked our inner circle (4 people) to share the link on each and every one of their Facebook friend’s wall on the morning we released the full version.  It took some time and effort, but we found that it got far more traction than simply sharing it on our own wall.

5)     We shared the video with relevant blog writers and asked them to share it with their readers.

6)     We made the video easily accessible from a number of landing pages on our website.

7)     We shared the video through our Facebook cause.

While 3,400 views is just a start, these strategies can be easily implemented by organizations of any size.  I hope these tips help you spread the word about your ministries!

Are you surprised that these tactics drive traffic for online videos?

YouTube is the #2 search engine on the web today.

In the time it takes you to read this post, over 100 hours of video have been uploaded to YouTube.  That’s because over 48 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube.com every minute of every day.

And people are watching a lot of it.   Viral video campaigns have changed our culture with millions and millions of video views.

And as we become a YouTube nation, viral videos are changing themselves.
YouTube Viral Videos in Church Marketing

So what makes a video go viral?  There are tons of people studying the phenomenon.  Here’s one guy that might be worth your video view — his job is to go to work each day and watch YouTube videos all day long.  Kevin Allocca is the “trends manager” at YouTube (as if trends can be managed. LOL).  But anyway, he recently spoke at TED sharing his 3 insights for why and when videos go viral across the Interwebs.

Check out his TED talk and see if you agree with him:

I believe the church marketer has the opportunity to produce messaging (and in video format too) that hits upon the points Kevin shares in his presentation on viral videos.  What can your church be doing to become the tastemaker locals come to trust and follow?  I’m talking about becoming the curator of excellent content, highlights of life in your city, and interviews with interesting people in your community.   Becoming relevant to the people outside your church walls is one way of gaining attention and trust as a contributor to community life in your city.

Now wouldn’t that be a totally unexpected yet refreshing role for a local church?